U.S. Texas Senator Ted Cruz Flees To Mexico With His Family, Seeking A Better Life

Category: You Can’t Make This Stuff Up

Snowflake, the Ted Cruz family poodle left behind, looks out to the street during the Texas power outage. © Michael Hardy, New York Post, 19 Feb 2021

Senator Cruz’s move is a good rebuttal on why a US-Mexico Wall won’t stop those really determined to travel over a thousand miles looking for a better life: he and his family used an airline to jump The Wall from the U.S. into Mexico. They left behind the family dog, Snowflake, in their 30 degree house, to be (hopefully) fed by a security guy guarding the house from the outside. I trust he has skills feeding those under his care by sliding a tin plate thru the door. Apparently the Cruz tribe have no friends who might care for Snowflake.

Cruz, of course, being the wussy he is, blamed his actions on his daughters, in a move obviously taken from the playbook of his mentor, the most recent past president. And, like that same ousted president, he clearly did not trust his wife to get the Mexican Job done, despite the fact she must be somewhat competent as she works for Goldman Sachs where you are, indeed, sacked if you don’t perform.

Meanwhile, on Wednesday evening the 17th, Beto O’Rourke tweeted:

@BetoORourke

“We made over 151,000 calls to senior citizens in Texas tonight. One of our vols talked to a man stranded at home w/out power in Killeen, hadn’t eaten in 2 days, got him a ride to a warming center and a hot meal. Help us reach more people, join us tomorrow…”


Tweet from Beto O'Rourke, 17 Feb 2021
Tweet from Beto O’Rourke, 17 Feb 2021

And in another meanwhile, the TheHill.com reported this morning (Lexi Lonas – 02/19/21 09:54 AM EST) that:

“Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) late Thursday raised $1 million for Texas relief organizations that are working to help the people suffering from the record-setting winter storm, and said she will make a trip to Houston this weekend.”

None of this should come as a surprise from our Republicans, a 19th century political party in a privatizing frenzy, beholden only to the wealthy. Their reasoning was put so clearly on February 16th by (now former) Colorado City, Texas Mayor, Tim Boyd.  Responding to his constituency pleading for heat, water and power, he tweeted, “only the strong will survive and the weak will parish.” (clearly a well-schooled intellectual, Boyd must bereferring to the church parishes stepping in to care for those in his town he wished to abandon). In the same tweet he wrote,

“No one owes you [or] your family anything; nor is it the local government’s responsibility to support you during trying times like this!” he said. “Sink or swim it’s your choice! The City and County, along with power providers or any other service owes you NOTHING! I’m sick and tired of people looking for a damn handout.”

Tweet from Tim Boyd, recently resigned as Colorado City, Texas, Mayor
Tweet from Tim Boyd, recently resigned as Colorado City, Texas, Mayor

If providing assistance to the community during a crisis is not the job of the peoples’ government we might well do without 75% of those tax-sucking bureaucrats whose salaries we pay!

Aung San Suu Kyi

Aung San Suu Kyi, extracted from a photograph of her meeting with U.S. Department of State Secretary Clinton, 2011 from Wikimedia Commons.
Aung San Suu Kyi, extracted from a photograph of her meeting with U.S. Department of State Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton, Rangoon, Burma, December 2, 2011 from Wikimedia Commons.


Many thousands of protestors turned out yesterday in the largest protests in Myanmar since 2007, flaunting the military-imposed state of emergency, brandishing pots, pans and balloons. They were, of course, protesting last week’s arrest and toppling of Aung San Suu Kyi, newly elected State Counsellor (equivalent to a Prime Minister/Head of State), 1991 Nobel Peace Prize laureate and daughter of General Aung San, ‘Father’ of both the modern Burmese army and the country of Myanmar, itself. The charges filed for her arrest: illegally importing walkie-talkies (that were used by her security detail.) The charge carries a maximum 3-year prison sentence upon conviction.

(Side Note: Conventions for personal names vary around the world and it can be difficult to know which are the ‘personal’ names and which the surnames. The Burmese have no official surnames: ‘Aung San Suu Kyi’ comes from her father’s name, ‘Suu’ from her paternal grandmother, and ‘Kyi’ from her mother Khin Kyi. And, writing of names, I challenge my friends to name the country’s capital city! …It is ‘Nay Pyi Taw’ (‘royal capital’ from ‘abode of the king’), not a re-naming of Yangon (formerly Rangoon) but a whole new city planned from scratch, like Brasilia. It was completed in 2012 and sits in what was formerly called Pyinmana District; coincidentally, the World War II headquarters of General Aung San.)

The military coup in Republic of the Union of Myanmar (formerly Burma) ought to be greeted with condemnation by all supporters of democracy. Equally, it should give us pause to think upon the fact that when people support ‘power’ instead of  ‘principals’, authoritarianism and autocracy instead of a representative government of egalitarian freedoms and justice, they run grave risks. It easily leads to the sort of treasonable behavior we saw in the United States on January 6th.

Vice President Mike Pence, a darling of the Right, became the target of treasonous individuals, gathering in massed-crowd proportions, calling out for his death as a traitor to their glorious leader. I cannot immediately think of another example of a person going from fawning, ass-kissing sycophant of the supreme leader to being targeted for death – overnight! (oh, wait… yes I can: Kim Jung-un’s uncle-by-marriage, Jang Song-thaek, who went from being North Korea’s #2 in power to being be-headed (according to what President Trump was told by Jong-un). When a democracy is based upon the valorization of personality instead of engraved-in-stone principals, trouble can be as close as a change in personality, particularly if that figurehead was seriously misread by pretty much everyone.

Our former governor and U.N. Ambassador (and member of my cigar club), Bill Richardson published a great Commentary yesterday in the Santa Fe New Mexican (oldest continuously publishing newspaper west of the Mississippi and still operated under family ownership). The article titled, “My Time with Aung San Suu Kyi”, details Richardson’s significant work in Myanmar with her.

“I felt immense disappointment in the woman who was my friend for over two decades, who championed democracy as a citizen but then failed as a leader to protect democratic ideals and basic human rights… During my [1994, first] encounter with her, she was already quite regal. Always very serious, she rarely laughed or joked. She spoke brilliantly about democracy, human rights, the Burmese people and her family… [she was] one of the few causes on which Sen. Mitch McConnell and President Barack Obama could agree. She was freed in 2010 and I met with her again in 2012, this time to offer assistance before the 2015 elections. At her request, in a very short time, my foundation trained more than 3,500 young political activists, political candidates and members of Parliament… Just two years later, her moral leadership was put to the test [the Rohingya genocide], and she failed miserably…

“My last encounter with Suu Kyi was a painful one. I was invited to Myanmar in early 2018 as part of an international panel set up by Myanmar allegedly to advise them on the Rohingya crisis. At one of the meetings with Suu Kyi, I brought up my concerns about the case of two Reuters reporters who had been jailed after reporting on evidence of alleged mass graves. I told her what I’d hoped she’d be brave enough to say. Democracies do not jail members of the press. She became furious with me, insisting the trial of the journalists was not within the scope of the advisory board. Her spokesperson issued a statement scolding me for deviating from the meeting’s agenda.

Soon after, I quit the panel and left the country. I simply could not participate in whitewashing genocide, and I was not going to be a cheerleader for Suu Kyi or for her government. During my visit, I witnessed Suu Kyi and her team attack with vigor the media, the United Nations and human rights groups that had championed her for years. I faced the sad reality that she was more focused on protecting her own power than the rights of her citizens.”

Governor Richardson’s article does not mention that Aung San Suu Kyi even went to the International Court of Justice at The Hague to defend the Burmese military against allegations of genocide against the Muslim Rohingya minority. Some 750,00 Rohingya fled Myanmar into refugee camps in Bangladesh where, last I checked, most still live in deplorable conditions. Bangladesh is to be lauded for taking in these desperate people when the country itself is one of the poorest on the planet (49th from the bottom of the world’s countries by GDP based on purchasing-power-parity per capita.)

Those old sayings of our grandparents endure because there is often an element of truth in them: “lie down with (street) dogs and you will get (bitten by) fleas.”

If you wish to know more about Aung San Suu Kyi there was an excellent profile in The New Yorker magazine some years ago.

Photo: Aung San Suu Kyi, 2011 from Wikimedia Commons

RIP: Hal Holbrook

(Cleveland, Ohio, 17 February 1925 – 23 January 2021, Beverly Hills, CA.)

“the man who has done more to keep Mark Twain on people’s minds than anyone else.” – HuffPost

Holbrook performing as Twain at the University of Houston
Hal Holbrook performing as Mark Twain at the University of Houston


I wondered how I had missed Mr. Holbrook’s death a week ago but it was not announced until today.

I remember we had to pay office rent as the student union was going thru financial turmoil but the building was still a haven from academics on the campus. It had even stayed open when the whole university closed due to riots over the Kent State killings in 1970.

As an undergraduate I had the use of a state car to drive back and forth to the capital, Columbus, Ohio for meetings. It was a big white Chevrolet that looked exactly like a state highway patrol car so I zoomed along Interstate-70 with other autos usually making way for me. If I stayed overnight in Columbus I would always go to my favorite restaurant, SeVa Longevity Cookery (Indian vegetarian on the northwest corner of N. High Street & W. Northwood Avenue) and then to a concert or other event; there was always something going on at The Ohio State University with its 45,000 students.

One evening I saw that Hal Holbrook was performing his ‘Mark Twain Tonight!’ next to the Union so I bought a ticket. It was riveting! As well it should: Harold Rowe Holbrook Jr. had started this role in 1954 while a student at not-too-far-away Denison University. And, he had won a Tony for Best Actor in a Play in 1966 for the role. He did the solo performances for about 60 years. In 2007, at the age of 82, Holbrook became the oldest nominee for Best Supporting Actor for his work in the movie ‘Into the Wild’.

As with so many buildings at OSU, there is a now a new Ohio Union and the auditorium I saw Holbrook perform in is no more. The space is now the Wexner Center for the Arts. And, yes, that is the same Wexner (Victoria’s Secret, The Limited, Pink, and Bath & Body Works) whose millions Jeffrey E. Epstein supposedly siphoned, when he was Wexner’s only client, in order to finance a lifestyle that included a New York mansion, a private plane, a luxury estate in Ohio and a large ranch here in New Mexico.

Coda:

John Joyce Gilligan’s (March 22, 1921 – August 26, 2013) was a liberal Democrat. I had never before – and have never since, met a man who had such a completely unreadable demeanor as Gov. Gilligan. It was all the more remarkable because he was also the palest human I had ever met. He must have been a great lawyer – and poker player.

Gilligan’s claim to fame as an Ohio governor was the institution of Ohio’s first corporate and personal income tax. He said it was necessary to cover the state’s inadequate methods to fund public schools. That move came back to haunt him when he lost against James ‘Big Jim’ Allen Rhodes (13 September 1909 – 4 March 2001) who twice before had been governor and had to sit out in 1970 because of term limits. Rhodes, of course, was governor during the 1907 Kent State University shootings by the Ohio National Guard.

Gilligan’s other claim to fame is being one-half of the first father/daughter U.S. governor duo. His daughter, Kathleen Sebelius, was Governor of Kansas (2003-2009) and Secretary of Health and Human Services (2009-2014) under President Barack Obama.

“Still photographs are the most powerful weapon in the world.” – Eddie Adams

Photographic Contact Sheet of Eddie Adams Showing the Train of Events Leading to Brigadier General Nguyễn Ngọc Loan Shooting Nguyễn Văn Lém, a Viet Cong Captain, February 1, 1968.
Photographic Contact Sheet of Eddie Adams Showing the Train of Events Leading to Brigadier General Nguyễn Ngọc Loan Shooting Nguyễn Văn Lém, a Viet Cong Captain, February 1, 1968. Adams titled the ninth image of the series, “Saigon Execution.” Photo of the contact sheet © and courtesy of AP and the Eddie Adams Estate.

While we can argue about the truth of this statement in an age when anyone can create videos, there is no denying the power of the still image.

The most shocking photo – and about the most shocking thing I had ever seen as a teenager, happened on this day, February 1, 1968. It was Adams’ photograph of the killing of Nguyễn Văn Lém (code name: Bảy Lốp) on a street in Saigon. Lém, a Viet Cong captain suspected of murdering South Vietnamese Lt. Col. Nguyen Tuan and his family, was made to stand before brigadier general Nguyễn Ngọc Loan, chief of the national police, who summarily executed him with a swift shot to the the head using his personal Smith & Wesson .38 Special. (Gen. Loan later said, “If you hesitate, if you didn’t do your duty, the men won’t follow you.”)

In 2019 I was fortunate to meet and talk to Adams’ widow, Alyssa Adkins, Deputy Editor of TV Guide, and buy the great photo book she had helped put together with a large number of Adams’ images.

Edward Thomas Adams (12 June 1933 – 19 September 2004) was a combat photographer in the Korean War while serving in the United States Marine Corps. From 1962 to 1980 he worked two stints for AP (Associated Press). His photographs made more than 350 covers for TIME and Parade magazines.

On that fated day in February 1968, just a couple days after the beginning of the Tet Offensive, he and NBC News television cameraman Võ Sửu were walking the streets of Saigon and saw what they thought might be a street interrogation as a prisoner was pulled out of a building. Both raised their cameras and began to photograph and film. As they did, Gen. Loan walked up, raised his pistol and summarily fired a bullet into Lem’s head.

Both the resulting photograph and Võ Sửu’s film coverage became indelibly linked to the brutal truth of a war that had become staple evening fare on television sets throughout the United States: our South Vietnamese ally engaged in the same terrible behaviors as the North Vietnamese they fought. It was something I thought of often as I approached my 18th birthday with an impending, subsequent draft lottery. The stills photo went on to win the 1969 Pulitzer Prize for Spot News Photography and the pronouncement from TIME magazine declaring it, “one of history’s 100 most influential photos.”

Was this the photograph of which Adams’ was most proud? No. That honor goes to his photograph “Boat of No Smiles” (1979) showing a 30-foot fishing boat loaded with Vietnamese fleeing their homeland. Like the photo subject of this post, it was influential: it eventually led Congress and President Jimmy Carter to open immigration to more than 200,000 Vietnamese refugees.

Over time Adams became sorry the Saigon shot came to be known as his most famous image:

“Two people died in that photograph: the recipient of the bullet and General Nguyen Ngoc Loan. The general killed the Viet Cong; I killed the general with my camera. Still photographs are the most powerful weapons in the world. People believe them; but photographs do lie, even without manipulation. They are only half-truths. … What the photograph didn’t say was, “What would you do if you were the general at that time and place on that hot day, and you caught the so-called bad guy after he blew away one, two or three American people?”…. This picture really messed up his life. He never blamed me. He told me if I hadn’t taken the picture, someone else would have, but I’ve felt bad for him and his family for a long time. … I sent flowers when I heard that he had died and wrote, “I’m sorry. There are tears in my eyes.”

– Eddie Adams. “Eulogy: General Nguyen Ngoc Loan”. Time Magazine; July 27, 1998.

There are so many interesting side notes to this story.

Similar to the idea in science that the very act of an individual viewing an event affects the event itself, Susan Sontag wrote about Gen. Loan, “he would not have carried out the summary execution there had they [journalists] not been available to witness it.” In 1978 there was an attempt to revoke Loan’s permanent residence ‘green card’ and Adams’ spoke in his defense with President Jimmy Carter halting the deportation, writing, “such historical revisionism was folly”.

Proving that no matter where you live it’s who you know that can shape your life, Loan studied pharmacy at university before entering the army where he was a classmate of Nguyễn Cao Kỳ. Kỳ became head of the air force (where Loan flew as his wing-man) and then, after a coup, the Prime Minister. Loan opened a pizzeria in Burke, Virginia outside Washington, DC. from the late 1970s until 1991.

Elements of connection in this story keep coming right up to the present. South Vietnamese Lt. Col. Nguyen Tuan who, along with his family, had been killed by Nguyễn Văn Lém, had a 10-year old son, Huan Nguyen. Huan did not die in that 1968 attack despite being shot three times and laying for hours next to his dying mother. Huan came to the United States and in 2019 became the first Vietnamese American to reach the rank of U.S Navy Rear Admiral.

I have tried to track down the NBC cameraman Võ Sửu without success. I will update this post if I ever find out more about him (tho the NBC site on the footage does not add more information.)

Finally, as famous – or infamous, as the photo of Gen. Loan shooting Lém is, Adams’ copyright was forfeit because the U.S. Copyright Act of 1909 requires that a copyright © notice accompany a photography every time it is published. Many newspapers published Adams’ photo, often cropped, in the days after February 1st without adding a copyright notice.

‘And still we rise.’

(To Paraphrase the writer Maya Angelou)

Official portrait of President Joe Biden in his West Wing Office at the White House, Jan. 10, 2013 when he was Vice President. (Official White House Photo by David Lienemann).
President of The United States of America Joseph Robinett Biden, Jr.

A few minutes ago, a breath of much-needed fresh air: the swearing into office of the 46th President of the United States, Joseph Robinett Biden, Jr.

And, the installation of the first woman Vice-President of the United States, who hails from a lineage of Africa and South Asia, Kamala Devi Harris.

Vice President of the United States of America, Kamela Devi Harris
Vice President of the United States of America, Kamala Devi Harris

Let’s hope we can finally work to beat the Covid-19 pandemic that has taken the lives of more than 400,000 of our compatriots in this country, and millions around the world, and begin to right our precariously listing ship of state.

A Black Notebook of Personal Joy: Hamilton, Trivers & Evolutionary Biology

My 1980 Notebook with Morrison Fountain Pen
My 1980 Notebook with Morrison Fountain Pen

In these dire times it feels a little more than self-indulgent to canter on about the minor joys in life; a desire to expound upon the little things when the world is on fire seems a private and guilty pleasure. But, while pondering standing down and standing by, I remembered a quote posted last year by an old friend in India:

Have Your Joy - Cleo Wade, Heart Talk

I’ve no idea who Cleo Wade is but this paragraph was/is a powerful reminder to stop and breathe – with a deep breath, at that, and gather your joy. And so I will expand upon my joy in re-living the excitement I felt when first reading of the research being done by William Donald Hamilton, FRS (1 August 1936 – 7 March 2000) and Robert Ludlow Trivers (b. February 19, 1943); especially Bob Trivers, one of the bad boys of science, and his work on the troubling existence of altruism in a world where survival appears to solely depends upon self-interest.

Robert Trivers - Courtesy, Rutgers University image
Robert Trivers – Courtesy, Rutgers University image

Some weeks ago I was looking for something I had written in one of my old journals and, in doing a fast sweep through one, I saw notes I had written on the work in evolutionary biology by Hamilton and Trivers. To have someone like Steven Pinker write, as he has of Trivers, that he is “one of the great thinkers in the history of Western thought” is not too shabby.

Page From My Early Notebooks on Hamilton & Trivers Altruism Studies
Page From My Early Notebooks on Hamilton & Trivers’ Altruism Studies

There is a profound beauty and deep pleasure in a life lived exploring the interests of the mind – or, rather, in the mysteries of the universe – of all things great and small. We imagine those who lead such lives rarely descend from the realm of theory and quick-firing neurons to spend time amongst the dross that daily surrounds those of us beetling away in the more mundane trenches of life. Or so it seems.

But there are exceptions. (I remember a great photograph of Stephen Hawking looking up from his motorized chair at the bottles of wine in a Pasadena supermarket. He could not reach the fruit of the vine on any but the lower third row of shelves. I’ve often wondered if the person who asked if he needed assistance ever knew who was being helped.)

The evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers has led a life that is anything but ordinary, both in the ivory tower and out. In a handful of ‘simple’ theoretical papers in the 1970s, seeking to lay a foundation of questions into the links between genetics and behavior, he spawned research into whole galaxies of new suppositions and questions. I remember these ideas were pervasive in university, and not just in biology departments. Two very influential books, in part spurred on by the kind of research he was doing, were published in the mid-1970s dealing with just the questions Trivers had grappled with: Richard Dawkins’ The Selfish Gene and E.O. Wilson’s Sociobiology. Both stirred controversy that spilled out into general publications and the consciousness of lay people. At the time I would often think it must have been a little like this in Darwin & Wallace’s mid-19th century day with their theories on evolution.

Trivers studied evolutionary theory at Harvard from 1968 to 1972 with Ernst Mayr, a man of many talents. But it is Mayr’s genius with work on speciation that broadened Darwin and Wallace’s dissection of Aristotle’s Great Chain of Being that most fascinates those of us who studied anthropology. Trivers had first gotten the biology bug from his paying work (writing science books for children) with the ornithologist William Drury who was, Trivers says, “the man who taught me how to think.” Critical consciousness: it is the most important intellectual skill a human can possess as far as I am concerned.

After a mental breakdown (bi-polar disorder) in his Harvard junior year Trivers considered a major in psychology (not a real science but, rather,’ a joke’) or law (“I thought I would do poverty law work” but was turned down by both Yale and the Univ of Virginia). In any case, his childhood interests in astronomy (a look into both the infinitesimally small and the ginormous) and mathematics have stood him well in his work with animal behavior. And, yes, ‘animal’, here, includes homo sapiens sapiens.

Curiosity is THE great driver of human intellectual, cultural and physical advance and Trivers has it and has had, so far, a life of the utmost divergence and a knack for criticizing what we generally think of as both the ‘Left’ and the ‘Right’ political sphere. His resume includes being a white guy member of The Black Panthers and friend of Huey P. Newton (together they published a scholarly paper analyzing the role of self-deception by the flight crew of Air Florida Flight 90 that crashed into the 14th Street bridge over the Potomac River in Washington, DC in 1982); a proposer of questions and principals in evolutionary biology papers that, pretty much alone, spawned totally new sub-disciplines in behavioral psychology, sociobiology, evolutionary this & that and more; a subject of a gun-point encounter near his home in Jamaica; academic suspension at Rutgers and academics attacks on a few of my clients and friends.

If you are now intrigued you might start with reading his 2015 autobiography that I am reading now: Wild Life: Adventures of an Evolutionary Biologist.

Finally, An Admission of What Most of US Already Knew: Demagogic Rule by the Minimal Maximum Leader for the Uneducated, Seething Masses!‘

Shaky U.S. Capitol Building
Shaky U.S. Capitol Building. © Wilbur Norman

10:43 am, 6 January, 2021

This isn’t their Republican Party anymore,’ Donald Trump Jr. says of GOP lawmakers who don’t back his father. – Wednesday morning, January 6, 2021“

The people [Republicans] who did nothing to stop the steal — this gathering [the agitators outside the White House this morning] should send a message to them,” Baby Trump said at a rally outside the White House. “This isn’t their Republican Party anymore. This is Donald Trump’s Republican Party.

The Washington Post reports that ‘Trump Jr. also pledged to work against the reelection of any Republican who doesn’t try to overturn the results, echoing his father’s threats against officials who have rebuffed his efforts’… “These guys better fight for Trump, because if they’re not, guess what?” he said. “I’m going to be in your backyard in a couple of months! … If you’re going to be the zero and not the hero, we’re coming for you, and we’re going to have a good time doing it.”

You must give credit to the evidently persuasive agit-prop of the Trumpers. Anytime you can take wages (vs. dividends), food security, education and health care from those most in need – and still have them worship the ground you walk on, you are a master illusionist.

Monkeying around with democracy, we have well & truly gunned our country into high gear toward becoming what we used to call a ‘banana republic’.

UPDATE to my morning post:

6 January 2021, 2:35pm

Of all the ‘sacred’ symbols of these United States of America – the flag, the white House, the Statue of Liberty, etc. none are more important – or potent, than the U.S. Capitol Building, the edifice where The Peoples’ Business is daily transacted. I think if we do a little research, we might have to go back to 1814 to find a time when the Capitol fell into the hands of an enemy of our democracy.

Interestingly, during these hours of a seditious, Trumpian mob’s breach and control of the building, the Senate has changed political party hands with the state of Georgia declaring Mr. Jon Ossoff (D) as the winner of the senate race there between him and David Perdue (R).

Both Democratic Party winners make this an historic contest: Ossoff is the first Jewish senator from Georgia and the other seat’s winner, Raphael Warnock (D) is the first Black American to win a Georgia senate seat. Two important moments of our history, a high and a low, braided into the same day. Let’s hope our democracy is not as fragile as the security of the building where its aims are carried out.

‘Cold Moon’ or ‘Long Night Moon’

First Full Moon of the Third Decade of the 21st Century, 29 December 2020

'Cold Moon' or 'Long Night Moon': First Full Moon of the Third Decade of the 21st Century - 29 Dec 2020
‘Cold Moon’ or ‘Long Night Moon’: First Full Moon of the Third Decade of the 21st Century – 29 Dec 2020

(Some, in error, might call it the last full moon of the second decade.)

Regardless… however you want to call it… it’s Beautiful!

Somewhere in my slides I have a pic of this full moon north of the Arctic Circle. Since, in December, it is directly opposite the sun, it ‘bookends’ the polar June sun, bearing a resemblance of sorts to the famous mid-summer midnight sun.

Hearing (Part One)

Article 2 in a series on The Senses

Video: A pure celebration of joy compliments of funk band Scary Pockets, led by Ryan Lerman and Jack Conte. This version of “I Say A Little Prayer” features a fantastic fey performance by Kenton Chen.

I cannot imagine a life without music and the ability to hear it.

Listening to Aretha Franklin’s ‘I Say a Little Prayer’ (written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David for Dionne Warwick, 1966) always creates more than a little frisson in my love for life. It is difficult for me to think of a song more perfectly crafted – and then delivered, by one of the stellar voices in the history of humankind (despite the song being a bigger hit for Warwick.)

“While combing my hair, now,And wondering what dress to wear, now”

What’s more it was written for the war of my generation: lyricist Hal David wrote it about a “woman’s concern for her man who’s serving in the Vietnam War”, portraying how someone you love can be an intense part of the fabric of your everyday routine with thoughts bought forth by even the smallest things we do. One of the great hooks of the song is that “you are always made to feel as if you’re either about to be loved or about to be left.” (“Burt Bacharach Song by Song” by Serene Dominic)

“I run for the bus, dear,While riding I think of us, dear.”

In February 1987, ‘New Musical Express’, a UK music weekly, published its critics’ top 150 singles of all time, with Franklin’s “I Say a Little Prayer” ranked at No. 1, but the song slipped and did not appear in their in-house critics’ top 100 singles poll in November 2002. Still, for many of us it remains

“Forever, and ever, / (You’ll stay in my heart and I will love you)”

The song became Franklin’s (March 25, 1942 – August 16, 2018) ninth and last consecutive Top 10 Atlantic label hit on the Hot 100 chart. Her version – may I say, THE version of this tune, makes a listener truly believe she is solo dancing around the house singing to her beloved, though we outsiders can be privy to her intense emotions of care, love and longing.

“My darling, believe me / For me there is no one but you / Please love me too”

‘I Say a Little Prayer’ moves from reverie to rousing joy and possesses elements of soul, gospel call & response, rock, jazz, balladry, you name it – but it’s sections of driving beat lends itself to multiple interpretations, even electronica and, dare I write it – The Ray Coniff Singers, whose version also sets a frisson in motion in me but of fear – lordy, lordy don’t subject me to listening to their whole rendition (perhaps rendition of another kind would bring the same feelings.) There is even a not-bad version with an accordion by Mary Black.

Burt Bachrach has said, “It’s [Aretha’s] a better record than the record we made… It’s just more natural,…We were talking about our changes and time changes on the chorus of ‘forever and forever, you stay in my heart, and I will’ — you know, that’s going 4-4, 3-4, 4-4, 3-4. Then regard the way it was treated by Aretha, because Aretha just makes it seamless, the transition going from one change to another change. You never notice it.”

“Mmhmm. We did, yeah. And we did a great record, but she topped it,” Hal David added during a joint Bachrach-David interview in 2010 with Terry Gross on her Philadelphia Fresh Air Public Radio program. (For my money I think Terry is the best interviewer of all time, by the by, and am sorry I never said as much when I used to run into her in the City of Brotherly Love).

But it is the clear-as-a-bell soul quality of Aretha’s voice that sends me and I’ve been fortunate to see the song performed by Aretha as well as the jazz horn player Rahsaan Roland Kirk (August 7, 1935 – December 5, 1977).

“My darling, believe me / For me there is no one but you / Please love me too / Answer my prayer / Answer my prayer now babe / Say you love me too / Answer it right now babe / Answer my prayer”

Video: A pure celebration of joy compliments of funk band Scary Pockets, led by Ryan Lerman and Jack Conte. This version of “I Say A Little Prayer” features a fantastic fey performance by Kenton Chen.

Star of Bethlehem?

Saturn (above) & Jupiter (below) a Few Days From Conjunction. The star Altair is to upper right and the star Formalhaut is out to the left. Four moons of Jupiter are visible at the 11:00 o'clock position.
Saturn (above) & Jupiter (below) a Few Days From Conjunction. The star Altair is to upper right and the star Formalhaut is out to the left. Four moons of Jupiter are visible at the 11:00 o’clock position. ©2020 Wilbur Norman

DO NOT FORGET to go out tonight, Winter Solstice evening Monday the 21st, and see the much-talked-about conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter. They have not been in this alignment (that is visible to us Earthlings) for 800 years! This treat will be visible in the Southwest for a couple hours after sunset. It might take a little time identify these two with the naked eye as they will be very close together and may look like ONE star instead of two close together planets! Binoculars will be a big help.

In my photos from the previous two nights Jupiter is on the bottom of its pairing but will switch positions with Saturn after tonight.

Jupiter’s four largest moons are Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, in order of distance from Jupiter. They are faintly visible in my top photo stretching out from the 11:00 o’clock position (Io and Europa are almost on top of each other.) At latest count Jupiter has 67 moons but the big four were discovered by Galileo in 1610 and are called, fittingly, the Galilean moons.

Saturn (above) & Jupiter (below) the Night Before Conjunction. Saturn's elongation is from its rings.
Saturn (above) & Jupiter (below) the Night Before Conjunction. Saturn’s elongation is from its rings. ©2020 Wilbur Norman


Solarwinds123

The world has recently learned of the sophisticated supply-chain attack on FireEye by inserting malicious code in a software update for a tool called SolarWinds Orion. The operation may have started as early as mid-2020. The Orion system is used by the U.S. Treasury Department, Commerce Department, Department of Homeland Security, the Pentagon, the Navy and many others. And, even as I type this post, Tuesday evening December 15, the security firm GreyNoise Intelligence reports, “SolarWinds still has not removed the compromised Orion software updates from its distribution server.”

DHS’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) purchased $45,000-worth of licenses for Solarwinds tools in 2019 while the U.S. Cyber Command spent over $12,000.

Solarwinds, in a legal filing yesterday, Monday, December 14, says malicious code was pushed to nearly 18,000 customers (that does not mean I am one customer and you are another. It means Microsoft Office 365, for example, is ONE customer.)

We can look to Microsoft to soon get an idea who, and how many, SolarWinds customers were really affected as Microsoft (according to a quick look at the Internet’s “Whois”) has taken control of the Domain (registered and managed by Go Daddy in Arizona) used to control the infected systems.

“Vinoth Kumar, a cybersecurity “bug hunter” who has earned cash bounties and recognition from multiple companies for reporting security flaws in their products and services, posted on Twitter that he notified SolarWinds in November 2019 that the company’s software download website was protected by a simple password that was published in the clear on SolarWinds’ code repository at Github.” – Krebson Security.

A Tweet by Vinoth Kumar to Solarwinds in November 2020 warning Solarwinds of security flaws. In this case, their password which had been published among their files at Github.
A Tweet by Vinoth Kumar to Solarwinds in November 2020 warning Solarwinds of security flaws. In this case, their password which had been published among their files at Github.

I must say that I am shocked… SCHOCKED that the (purportedly) Russian hackers were able to get through the sophisticated systems in place at Solarwinds, a company so advanced I have heard they did not even see the need for an internal chief of cybersecurity. I mean who at the Russian FSB, even tho they have some of the best cyber-hackers on the planet, would ever have thought to build code-busting software to break the heavy-duty security at Solarwinds?

Oh… wait a minute! The password was published amongst the public repository of Solarwinds files at Github. It was a masterful password most of us would have had to write on the back of our hands to remember: solarwinds123

I. could. not. make. this. s—. up.

Have You Written for Disney and Stopped Receiving Royalties?

A Contract Torn Asunder
A Contract Torn Asunder

A Letter from Mary Robinette Kowal, President of the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America:

Have you written anything for Disney or its subsidiaries and stopped receiving royalties? SFWA has become aware of several members in this position.

Last year, Alan Dean Foster came to SFWA’s Grievance Committee because he had written novels and was not being paid the royalties that were specified in his contract. With his permission, we have made this dispute public because the core of it affects more than just Mr. Foster.

It has the potential to affect every writer. Disney made the argument that they had purchased the rights but not the obligations of his contract. In other words, they believe they have the right to publish work, but are not obligated to pay the writer no matter what the contract says.

If we let this stand, it could set precedent to fundamentally alter the way copyright and contracts operate in the United States. All a publisher would have to do to break a contract would be to sell it to a sibling company.

We are currently in talks with Disney about Mr. Foster’s royalties and are looking forward to a speedy resolution. They have told us that they want to talk to any writers who have a belief that they are owed money.

Disney seems to believe that he is a unique example. We know that he is not. We have heard from enough authors to see a pattern.

If you are a writer experiencing non-payment of royalties, or missing royalty statements, with Disney or its subsidiaries, please report your circumstances to us via this form. We guarantee your anonymity.

If you are not directly affected but wish to help, please use the hashtag #DisneyMustPay to discuss the value of writers and the problems with their position on contracts. You may also donate to SFWA’s legal fund, which helps authors with legal fees in situations like this.

We are committed to continuing conversations with Disney until these contractual issues are satisfactorily resolved.

Mary Robinette Kowal, President, Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America

[Wilbur – The National Writer’s Union]

(Anti-)Social Media Platforms & The Erosion of Democracy and Social Justice

Anti-Social Media Platforms & The Erosion of Democracy and Social Justice

(Or, why surveillance capitalism is bad for you and the world)

Part 1 of 3

“Social media, once an enabler, is now the destroyer, building division—‘us against them’ thinking— into the design of their platforms…. It’s time to end the whack-a-mole approach of the technology platforms to fix what they have broken,” – Rappler CEO Maria Ressa

“The past years have offered a wake-up call for those who needed it….Without explicit and enforceable safeguards, the technologies promised to advance democracy will prove to be the ones that undermine it. It is now vital that democracy is made more resilient,” – Marietje Schaake. former EU parliamentarian

Most people, historically, have been alarmed by intrusions of government and its spying into the lives of ordinary citizens. But, while our attentions have been fixated on this, we ‘dropped the ball’ on the far more invasive mining and use of personal data by the large companies we, all of us, have connections to, however deep and pervasive or fleeting and sporadic.

In 2014, based upon the rising amount of captured data large companies, led by  “social media” companies, were beginning to harvest and utilize, Shoshana Zubroff coined the term “surveillance capitalism” to describe this mountain of personal data accumulating in staggering quantity each year. It is a business model predicated on harvesting the online user experience and then manipulating human behavior for monetization, that is, a basic move from processing internal to mining external data, a handy and lucrative convergence of enterprise and consumer IT. Now, many of these mega-companies generate more revenue and exercise more power that all but a handful of the world’s nations.

In 2016 the World Economic Forum (the group that meets in Davos every year) reported that of the world’s top 100 global economic entities, (measuring revenue, not GDP) 69 were corporations – meaning only 31 were countries. Here, in order, were the top 10 entries:

  • USA
  • P.R. China
  • Germany
  • Japan
  • France
  • United Kingdom
  • Italy
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Walmart

This list might strike the sobering thought that economic powerhouses like South Korea, Russia, Switzerland and others were, in fact, further down the list. The trend continues so that by 2018 157 of the top 200 world economic entities by revenue were corporations, not countries.

Here were the top 10 companies in 2016 with their world economic ranking by revenue in parenthesis:

  • Walmart (10)
  • State Grid (14) [a Chinese company]
  • China National Petroleum (15)
  • Sinopec Group (16)
  • Royal Dutch Shell (18)
  • Exxon Mobil (221)
  • Volkswagon (22)
  • Toyota Motor (23)
  • Apple (25)
  • BP (27)

Now, for a 2020 country update, using International Monetary Fund data: USA and China are still top dogs, Japan and Germany switched positions, India made an appearance at spot #5, UK and France swapped lanes, followed by the same three, Italy, Brazil Canada, as in 2016. Rounding out the next ten countries – but not revenue generation when companies are tossed into the mix, are Russia, South Korea, Spain, Australia, Mexico, Indonesia, Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Switzerland.

Showing it is difficult to break into the top 20 countries is the fact that 17 of these top 20 were also on the list in 1980, that is, 40 years ago.

For a 2020 update on companies (from Fortune 500 data) we have:

  • Walmart
  • Sinopec Group
  • State Grid
  • China National Petroleum
  • Royal Dutch Shell
  • Saudi Aramco
  • Volkswagon
  • BP
  • Amazon.com
  • Toyota Motor

So why are these figures important? Ah… I am pleased you asked.

For one, it means that many sovereign nations cannot rein in companies engaging in bad behaviour within their borders – even if and when they have the desire. Chevron in the Peruvian Amazon comes to mind. Oil exploration is a dirty business and when little recoverable amounts are found there is still a mess to clean up – or not. In a place like the Amazon who is going to see the contamination other than indigenous locals?

But the issues I am getting to here are more about the so-called ‘social media’ giants, companies we used to think of as having a clean footprint.

In the early years of the internet revolution early adopters of the technology bought into services billed as connecting/informing us at the speed of the electron, prepping us for our lives in the 21st century. These services were, in the main, offered for free as companies, including newsrooms, tried to figure out how to monetize their products. The few ads we would see were bothersome but easy to ignore, especially as they lacked personal focus and sophisticated tracking technology. It reminds me of the early hype of the energy companies with their mascot Ready Kilowatt and the 1954 statement of Lewis Strauss, then chairman of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, with his alluring, sloganeering promise to the National Association of Science Writers: “electrical energy too cheap to meter!” – a good example of what we now know as “overpromising & underdelivering.”

Reddy Kilowatt, © Reddy Kilowatt, Inc.
Reddy Kilowatt, © Reddy Kilowatt, Inc.

In less than twenty years internet coding wizards have made stratospheric leaps and small startups have combined, morphed and advanced into extremely sophisticated entities. At the same time we have come to recognize there is a dark underbelly bolstering the magical kingdom of all-connection, all-the-time. A 24/7 existence, like so much of life’s general intrusions, is a two-edged sword.

I think of surveillance capitalism as a natural outgrowth of a technology and life forewarned in 1956 by the brilliant, if troubled, science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. In his novella (made famous by the Spielberg movie) “The Minority Report” three mutants foresee a person’s propensity for committing a ‘future crime’. Their prescience determines the future and freedom, or lack thereof, of ordinary citizen’s based upon criminal actions before they happen. In the same way, surveillance capitalism attempts to predict our future voting, movie-going, book-reading, food shopping, sexual preference… well… all behavior and, subsequently, influence that behavior in a semi-predictable manner, that is, move us toward a specific purchase.

If not a purchase exactly, then other economic considerations come into play. A good example is the selling of ‘spit’ data from the genealogical work performed by the company 23 & Me, a noted seller of DNA info to ‘third parties’. They caused a minor tremor in 2018 when they announced the sharing of consumers’ anonymized genetic data with pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline. Sharing is, of course, a euphemism for ‘selling’; in this case GSK shared $300-million. While it is hopeful that people with inheritable genetic diseases may well benefit from this deal in the form of future medicines, data security is never distant from my mind, especially as data security is, it appears, never in all ways, secure all the time. Do you really want your health insurance company (who has always been a gatherer of data that could be used in health/mortality actuarial practice) rescinding your coverage because you have a 35% chance of getting motor neuron disease or some other ailment?

Two years ago I was sitting with a friend talking about his new Maserati. An hour later an ad for Maserati popped up on my mobile phone browser during a search for something totally unrelated to cars. That is when I discovered that Google has a division with a huge number of employees developing, listening in and then tweaking their speech and voice components for their algorithms. Turn off your microphones! Siri and Alexa are you listening? (Being highly open to suggestion, I inquired as to whether Google was assisting with monthly car payments but received no answer.)

So, how is all this related to Democracy and Social Justice?

Commercial connections have forever had tentacles entwined with, and embedded into, governmental components. While governments are often slow on the uptake of the new (and, to grant and uphold citizen rights) their bureaucratic nature and love of big data do eventually move the organs of governance to utilize the lessons of commerce. This learning often first makes an appearance to ‘improve’ focus on the big picture of where ‘trouble’ among the rank and file may begin, never mind the trouble may only be citizens engaging in their constitutionally guaranteed rights of assembly and protest.

But, before we go into more detail here let’s sidestep and read a little about the

Big Picture & Big Data

That big picture is assisted by ‘big data‘, a term coined in a 1997 scientific paper by NASA. ‘Big data’ is, by definition, unwieldy. It is defined by Wikipedia (even before the Oxford English Dictionary added it to their list) as “an all-encompassing term for any collection of data sets so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using on-hand data management tools or traditional data processing applications.”

There is a pervasive belief that it is true the more data one accumulates the more answers one has available; that is, quantity is in itself a necessary and sufficient parameter for accurate research. But AnnaLee Saxenian, dean of the UC Berkeley School of Information, one of the leading lights in data and its management, writes that, “We want students and consumers of our research to understand that volume isn’t sufficient to getting good answers… [the] School challenges students in the online Master of Information and Data Science program to approach data with intentionality, beginning with the way they talk about data. They learn to dig deeper by asking basic questions: Where does the data come from? How was it collected and was the process ethical? What kinds of questions can this data set answer, and which can it not?… We run the risk of forgetting why we collect data in the first place: to make our world better through granular details,… The way we talk about data matters, because it shapes the way we think about data. And the ways we apply, fund, and support data today will shape the future of our society.”

The school says this process is part of ‘data science’. A more useful shorthand than big data, the words imply a rigorous approach to analytics and data mining. This view espouses that, “a data set is not so much a painting to be admired but a window to be utilized; scientists use data to see the world and our society’s problems more clearly.”

Another definition of big data, from the McKinsey Global Institute, is “datasets whose size is beyond the ability of typical database software tools to capture, store, manage, and analyze.” This has been tackled in the past two decades by trimming big data down to size. Data scientists have created new tools for collecting, storing, and analyzing these vast amounts of information. “In some sense, the ‘big’ part has become less compelling,” according to Berkeley’s Saxenian.

A Quick Lesson in Data Volumes: The volume of data in a single file or file system can be described by a unit called a byte. However, data volumes can become very large when dealing with, say, Earth satellite data. Below is a table to explain data volume units (credit Roy Williams, Center for Advanced Computing Research at the California Institute of Technology).

  • Kilo- means 1,000; a Kilobyte is one thousand bytes.
  • Mega- means 1,000,000; a Megabyte is a million bytes.
  • Giga- means 1,000,000,000; a Gigabyte is a billion bytes.
  • Tera- means 1,000,000,000,000; a Terabyte is a trillion bytes.
  • Peta- means 1,000,000,000,000,000; a Petabyte is 1,000 Terabytes.
  • Exa- means 1,000,000,000,000,000,000; an Exabyte is 1,000 Petabytes.
  • Zetta- means 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000; a Zettabyte is 1,000 Exabytes.
  • Yotta- means 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000; a Yottabyte is 1,000 Zettabytes

We will return to this later in a discussion of social media algorithms.

Governments have always been nervous about protest of any kind. The validity of such jitters was brought home with the ability of mass movements’ non-violent action in bringing down governments of Warsaw Pact countries and the Soviet Union itself, felling them like phantom dominoes in Southeast Asia. Similar events shook the Islamic countries with the ‘Arab Spring’ uprisings.

Governments like using a scattershot approach to try and corral the proverbial needle in a haystack. Certainly we all want the authorities to catch terrorists seeking to do our country harm. But, is a record of all the telephone calls in the country, in real time, going to assist that endeavor? The ubiquitous use of cellular communications lends itself to lax control even for bad actors. So, as listening to U.S. citizen’s phone calls without a judge’s warrant is illegal, perhaps simply getting a list of all the outgoing and incoming numbers being called by people in the U.S., and the duration of the calls, might be helpful? It is that word ‘might’ that bothers me. I’ve no problem with law enforcement requesting and receiving records after an arrest, or the request for a wiretap with probable cause, but the uncontrolled amassing of the 3Vs (volume, variety, velocity – see graph, below) is troubling. A few years ago I was happy to read that when the administration wanted to monitor the mobile phone records of everyone in the United States all the big companies, except for my carrier, T-Mobile, rolled over without requiring probable cause warrants or even administrative subpoenas.

The 3Vs of Big Data. Berkeley School of Information.
The 3Vs of Big Data. Berkeley School of Information.

END of Part 1.

Part 2 tomorrow!

Beware the Demon Pomposity

Bob Woodward from a "Journalism Under Fire' Zoom meeting, the evening of 3 Dec 2020
Bob Woodward from a “Journalism Under Fire’ Zoom meeting, the evening of 3 Dec 2020

Less than an hour ago I ended one of the most informative and entertaining Zoom sessions I have ever had: Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward speaking as part of the ending ceremony of our 2020 ‘Journalism Under Fire’ conference in Santa Fe.

The president would not talk to Woodward for his book titled “Fear” released in 2018. After publication White House staff told the president the information in the book was basically true and accurate, so he agreed to talk to Woodward for the latest book “Rage”.

Woodward observed that one way of getting an interview is just to show up. Many today use email or telephones or texts to conduct interviews but do not go that extra mile to show up in person. Covid-19 put a stop to most in-person interviews so he and Trump talked by phone, usually at night which suited Woodward because of an adage he holds dear: “Lies in the Day, Truth at Night.”

During the nine months they talked on the phone President Trump did not let anyone at the White House know he was talking with Woodward and, upon publication, lashed out at the book but has since said he read the book and is pleased that he got many of his points out there in its pages.

A topic of current interest was touched upon in our Zoom meeting: presidential pardons. In 1998 Woodward interview Gerald Ford and asked him why he never pressed Nixon for an admission of guilt. Ford pulled out his wallet. He went thru the wallet and found a small, folded old newspaper clipping and showed it to Woodward. It had an article about a US Supreme Court decision from 1915 reading, in part, “Acceptance, as well as delivery, of a pardon is essential to its validity”, that is, an acceptance of a pardon is admission of guilt. [Note: The case was Burdick v. United States, 236 U.S. 79. Quaere – whether the President of the United States may exercise the pardoning power before conviction. “The facts, which involve the effect of a pardon of the President of the United States tendered to one who has not been convicted of a crime nor admitted the commission thereof, and also the necessity of acceptance of a pardon in order to make it effective, are stated in the opinion.”]

Woodward ended our Zoom with a story he has told before. After Nixon resigned Washington Post publisher Katherine Graham sent a note she had written on a yellow legal pad to Woodward & Bernstein. On it she had written a statement mentioning that their work had been important in bringing down a president and ending with a warning that all of us may take to heart: “Beware the demon pomposity”.

You are either on the bus or off the bus. Rosa Parks 65 years ago today.

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama
Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Courtesy UPI, 1956

Rosa Parks sits in the front of a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the city’s segregation on the bus system illegal. Behind her is Nicholas C. Chriss, a UPI reporter covering the event.

It’s the 1st of December 1955, late afternoon in Montgomery, Alabama. A seamstress, going home after a long day of labor, takes a seat toward the front of the bus’s ‘Colored Section’. The bus begins to fill with passengers as it moves along its route. Eventually, the driver, James F. Blake, tells the seamstress to move further to the rear so a white man can take her seat. His demand is just one of the many, ‘ordinary’ actions Black Americans have had to endure throughout most of American history.

But on this day the seamstress, 42-year-old Rosa Parks (who was also the Secretary of the local NAACP), decides she is fed up, or, as she put is, “was tired of giving in.”

You know the type of day I’m writing about: it’s just one of those days when you simply don’t give a f—. Whatever happens, as a result of your obstinacy, happens. ‘Bring it on!’

On this day, 1 December 1955, 65 years ago, Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat. The police are called. Rosa is arrested. Mrs. Rosa Parks is convicted of disorderly conduct four days later and pays a fine.

We know the rest of the story but, as a refresher:

A 26-year-old Baptist minister, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. with the Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA), spearheaded a Black American, 381-day boycott of Montgomery’s bus system. Workers made do with makeshift transport scraped together using peoples’ cars as taxis to get to and from their workplaces. Rev. King had only recently moved to Montgomery and it was this that led him to being picked to lead the MIA: he was too new and unknown to have any enemies in the city.

Finally, in the autumn of 1956, the U.S. Supreme Court affirmed a district court’s ruling that segregation on Alabama’s public transport deprived Blacks of equal protection under the Constitution’s 14th Amendment and was, therefore, illegal. But, that was only for Alabama. It was not until 1964 when President Lyndon B. Johnson, a son of the South, signed the Civil Rights Act that ALL public transportation in The United States was desegregated.

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) lived a full life and took a step requiring the utmost in bravery (somewhat difficult for us to recognize now with the superior legal protections many – tho not all, of us enjoy.)

She was honored by the U.S. Congress: her coffin was placed on view in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC. While Mrs. Parks was the 30th person to lie in state there, she was the first woman! Her coffin was placed on the same catafalque (the decorated wooden framework supporting the coffin of a distinguished person during a funeral or while lying in state) that was built for Abraham Lincoln.

Five Bighorn Sheep Above the Rio Grande

Five Bighorn Sheep on the Cliffs of the Rio Grande
Five Bighorn Sheep on the Cliffs of the Rio Grande

The photo above was taken with a Leica-R 280mm f4 telephoto manual lens, with a 1.4x Extender and an R-to-M adapter, all mounted on a Leica M10-R.

It was such a beautiful day I took off from a Zoom meeting and drove the 50 miles to look for bighorn sheep head butting during the rut. No battles found, just a quiet small group.

One youngster is very hard to see unless you know he is laying down with only his head showing. In the photo above I have circled him. He has rudimentary horns, unlike the youngster at upper left.

Sighting Bighorn Sheep with the Naked Eye
Sighting Bighorn Sheep with the Naked Eye

This second photo, above, is what the area looks like with a lens that mimics the field-of-view of human eyes (that is, a 40mm lens) versus the 280mm telephoto setup used for photo #1. Believe it or not, three of the sheep (within the circle) are visible to the naked eye because of their white butts. Admittedly, I have 20-10 corrected eyesight but most people with normal vision ought to be able to do as well.

For those out looking for sheep on your own I think the most helpful advice I can offer is to look for the white butts of the sheep. I just use my eyesight as I always forget to take binoculars with which to glass the slopes.

64 Journalists Missing in 2020

And circa 248 in prison for doing their jobs

Journalists Missing Around the World in 2020. Compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists
Journalists Missing Around the World in 2020. Compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists.

The Missing
Compiled by the Committee to Protect Journalists

Name Organization Date Location
Acquitté Kisembo Agence France-Presse June 26, 2003 Democratic Republic of the Congo
Ahmed Al-Dulami Al-Sharqiya TV June 1, 2014 Iraq
Alfredo Jiménez Mota El Imparcial April 2, 2005 Mexico
Ali Astamirov Agence France-Presse July 4, 2003 Russia
Andrei Bazvluk Lita-M August 11, 1996 Russia
Austin Tice Freelance August 13, 2012 Syria
Aziz Bouabdallah Al-Alam al-Siyassi April 12, 1997 Algeria
Azory Gwanda Mwanachi, The Citizen November 21, 2017 Tanzania
Bashar Fahmi Al-Hurra August 20, 2012 Syria
Belmonde Magloire Missinhoun Le Point Congo October 3, 1998 Democratic Republic of the Congo
Djamel Eddine Fahassi Alger Chaîne III May 6, 1995 Algeria
Djuro Slavuj Radio Pristina August 21, 1998 Serbia & Montenegro
Elyuddin Telaumbanua Berita Sore August 17, 2005 Indonesia
Emmanuel Munyemanzi Rwandan National Television May 2, 1998 Rwanda
Farhad Hamo Rudaw TV March 9, 2015 Syria
Feliks Titov Nevskoye Vremya February 1, 1995 Russia
Fred Nérac ITV News March 22, 2003 Iraq
Gamaliel López Candanosa TV Azteca Noreste May 10, 2007 Mexico
Gerardo Paredes Pérez TV Azteca Noreste May 10, 2007 Mexico
Guy-André Kieffer Freelance April 16, 2004 Ivory Coast
Ham Jin Woo Daily NK May 29, 2017 China
Isam al-Shumari Sudost Media August 15, 2004 Iraq
Ishzak Ould Mokhtar Sky New Arabia October 15, 2013 Syria
Jamal Sobhy Al-Mosuliya TV July 1, 2014 Iraq
Jean Bigirimana Iwacu July 22, 2016 Burundi
Jean-Pascal Couraud Les Nouvelles December 15, 1997 French Polynesia
John Cantlie Freelance November 22, 2012 Syria
José Antonio García Apac Ecos de la Cuenca en Tepalcatepec November 20, 2006 Mexico
Kamaran Najm Metrography June 12, 2014 Iraq
Kazem Akhavan IRNA July 4, 1982 Lebanon
Maisloon al-Jawady Al-Mosuliya TV June 29, 2014 Iraq
Maksim Shabalin Nevskoye Vremya February 1, 1995 Russia
Manasse Mugabo UN Assistance Mission in Rwanda Radio August 19, 1995 Rwanda
Manuel Gabriel Fonseca Hernández El Mañanero September 17, 2011 Mexico
Marco Antonio López Ortiz Novedades Acapulco June 7, 2011 Mexico
María Esther Aguilar Cansimbe El Diario de Zamora Cambio de Michoacán November 11, 2009 Mexico
Miguel Angel Domínguez Zamora El Mañana March 1, 2010 Mexico
Miguel Morales Estrada Diario de Poza Rica, Tribuna Papanteca July 19, 2012 Mexico
Mohamed al-Saeed Syrian State TV July 19, 2012 Syria
Mohamed Hassaine Alger Républicain March 1, 1994 Algeria
Mohammed Galal Okasha Al Barqa TV August 1, 2014 Libya
Muayad Saloum Orient TV November 1, 2013 Syria
Muhannad al-Okaidi Al-Mosuliya TV August 1, 2014 Iraq
Nadhir Guetari First TV September 8, 2014 Libya
Omar Younis al-Ghaafiqi Sama Mosul October 12, 2014 Iraq
Oralgaisha Omarshanova (Zhabagtaikyzy) Zakon i Pravosudiye March 30, 2007 Kazakhstan
Pedro Argüello El Mañana, La Tarde March 1, 2010 Mexico
Prageeth Eknelygoda Lanka eNews January 24, 2010 Sri Lanka
Qais Talal Sama Mosul August or October 2014 Iraq
Rafael Ortiz Martínez Zócalo, XHCCG July 8, 2006 Mexico
Ramón Ángeles Zalpa Cambio de Michoacán April 6, 2010 Mexico
Reda Helal Al-Ahram August 11, 2003 Egypt
Salvador Adame Pardo 6TV May 18, 2017 Mexico
Samir Kassab Sky News Arabia October 15, 2013 Syria
Sergei Ivanov Nevskoye Vremya June 1, 1995 Russia
Sergio Landa Rosado Diario Cardel January 23, 2013 Mexico
Sofiene Chourabi First TV September 8, 2014 Libya
Vasyl Klymentyev Novyi Stil August 11, 2010 Ukraine
Vitaly Shevchenko Lita-M August 11, 1996 Russia
Vladjimir Legagneur Freelance March 14, 2018 Haiti
Waheed Mohammed Naji Haider (Waheed al-Sufi) al-Arabiya April 6, 2015 Yemen
Walid al-Qasim Aleppo News Network October 12, 2014 Syria
Yelena Petrova Lita-M August 11, 1996 Russia
Younis al-Mabrok al-Moghazy Al Barqa TV August 1, 2014 Libya

Words Have Meaning

knowledge prudence insight sensitivity appreciation wisdom compassion mindfulness consciousness patience regard integrity understanding science respect intelligence wit sense expertise patriotism recognition sagacity thanks experience esteem acumen reason ability stability examine conviction praise discernment foresight cognizance judgement poise thought sophistication learning critique sanity caution deference faculty observation comprehension logic gratefulness perspicacity attention soul brilliance thoughtfulness care judiciousness discretion astuteness brains clarity tact forgiveness sensibility review information sympathy erudition profundity equitable vigilance feel circumspection empathy subtlety acknowledgement obligation gratitude behavior credit reciprocity support veneration perception realization laud sentiment approval admiration contemplation blessing warm evaluation community deliberation muse plan conception notice representation envisage design imagination study commune impression ideas assess inform elucidate taste heed concord rapport warmth belief refinement intuition spirit capacity concern merit analyze conviction research devotion extol value remembrance courage

leadership  honor truth

Today’s Birthday: Benjamin Banneker – An 11th Generation Ancestor

A manuscript page from Benjamin Banneker's almanac (courtesy American Antiquarian Society)
A manuscript page from Benjamin Banneker’s almanac (courtesy American Antiquarian Society)

On this day in 1731 Benjamin Banneker (died 19 October 1806), free African-American man of science, author, surveyor and grandson of Bannaka, an African prince, was born in Baltimore County, Maryland. He produced commercially successful almanacs in the 1790s, and his knowledge of astronomy helped him be a part of Andrew Ellicott’s team that Thomas Jefferson ordered to survey land for the young nation’s capital city, Washington, DC.

Banneker, an older contemporary of my 6th generation grandfather, Bazil Norman (who fought in six military campaigns of the American Revolution) never married or had children. But, I am an 11th generation descendant of his sister Jemima. (In 11 generations of Banneker descendants the long-lived Normans only had 6; we marry late and, usually, live long!)

And Jemima begat Meslach who begat Mary who begat Sophia who begat Mary Elizabeth who begat George who begat James ‘Blind Jim’ who begat Mary ‘Polly’ who begat William Franklin who begat my father who begat ME!

Alas, on the day of Banneker’s funeral his cabin burned to the ground destroying almost all his papers and belongings. One journal and some rescued furniture were kept until recently by the Ellicott family, descendants of those original DC surveyors and also founders of Ellicott City, Maryland. A few items are at The Maryland Historical Society tho a Virginia collector bought most of the extant material at a 1996 auction.

I make a valiant attempt to honor my great grandmother Mary Polly’s dictum written on the sheet of paper holding her portrait: “If you don’t remember us grandchild. Who Will?” Polly was Jemima Banneker’s 8th generation grand daughter.

Mary Polly Norris-Norman (1 May 1844 - 12 March 1941)
Mary Polly Norris-Norman

Photo Credits: a page from Benjamin Banneker’s journal (courtesy American Antiquarian Society) and Mary Polly Norris-Norman (1 May 1844 – 12 March 1941) (courtesy Norman Family Archive).

RIP: Baron Wolman, Photographer Extraordinary

“Mixing business with pleasure since 1965.” – Baron Wolman, Santa Fe, New Mexico

Photo © 1969 Baron Wolman. Jerry Garcia revealing to the public, for the first time, his missing finger.
Photo © 1969 Baron Wolman. Jerry Garcia revealing to the public, for the first time, his missing finger.

Small in stature and large in heart, Baron Wolman (25 June 1937 – 2 November 2020) died yesterday, 3 November 2000, at the age of 83.

Tho born years apart we both hailed from “The Great Midwest” and were born near each other. Lest you wonder if you ever saw his pictures let me write – ‘Yes! You most certainly have – even tho you may not have known it!’ He was at Woodstock with cameras in hand and was the first photographer at Rolling Stone Magazine (1967-1970) where Jan Wenner has said Baron set the look for the magazine. Photographing The Grateful Dead band was Baron’s job for the first issue of the magazine. Not too shabby!

Baron sold his first photo, the construction of the Berlin Wall, to The Columbus Dispatch Newspaper for $50, a pic from a gig not many probably knew he had: counterintelligence in Berlin for Uncle Sam as a volunteer in the U.S. Army!

His last post to Facebook in October was typically self-effacing:

“Just as the sun sets over the Pacific, so, too, is it about to set over my life. A few of you know that a year ago I was give[n] the formal diagnosis of ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), a disease for which there is no cure. Sad to say I’m now in the final sprint to the end. I go forward with a huge amount of gratitude for the many blessings bestowed upon me (family, friends, travels and more), with no regrets and appreciation for how my photographs – my life’s work – have been received. Leave comments if you wish, but please don’t ask any questions or expect any further words from me – I am very, very weak. Because of Covid, like thousands of others, I will pass quietly and with very few people around me. It’s been a great life, with Love being my salvation always… #fotobaron#thefotobaron#vote#voteblue2020

Baron was a class act to the end and I trust he will be surrounded by the same sentiments he wrote to me in one of his books: “Peace, Love & Music!”

meandering & idle speculations on nothing & everything                                          

%d bloggers like this: